Vata type: All about the Ayurvedic constitutional type

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You are soon gripped by stress and anxiety. It often doesn't take much at all. One would think that people who are already overly active would be best able to deal with chaotic and stressful situations. Well, that is only partly the case. As far as activity and movement are concerned, Vata as an Ayurvedic dosha is very high. And yet, increased Vata is directly related to stress and restlessness .

This may all sound very confusing; let's expand a little thematically:

The meaning of the constitution types in European Ayurveda®.

Basically, Ayurveda speaks of 3 doshas. The word translated means something like 'fault potential'. It is important to know that everyone carries all three fault potentials and depending on whether Vata, Pitta or Kapha is predominant by nature, this shapes the character, the personality and the tolerance for this or that circumstance. In European Ayurveda® we also call the three types "bioenergies".

Let's take the Vata potential as a brief example. It provides energy and creativity in the organism. If there is a lot of it, you tend to be a fast and lively person. If the level rises, however, it can turn into nervousness and restlessness. If too little Vata is present, discontent, hopelessness, lack of courage and listlessness will set in.

Vata is of particular importance here. If it becomes imbalanced, and it does so more easily than the other two doshas, 'complications' in the form of illnesses are most likely to occur.

What are Vata types like?

People who are rather slim and fragile in build tend to have a high Vata potential. Sensitive in body and mind, they often have cold and dry hands and feet and are prone to psychosomatic illnesses.

The elements associated with it are wind or air and ether (or space), but actually the fragile and sensitive body does not necessarily get along well with windy climates - especially if it is also cold. Vata-attuned people like to escape from cold, windy weather.

This dosha shapes the moving principle. Everything that moves in our body is determined by this energy: Breath, digestion, metabolism, thoughts. And a lot of Vata logically means a lot of movement. Speed, flexibility, multifacetedness, a bit of chaos and instability are what Vata types are made of.

Vata types are curious and always want to discover new things.

In the body, this is manifested by a fast but sensitive digestion, a delicate physique and a sensitive nervous system. If there is too much Vata, it can lead to digestive problems, states of exhaustion, nervous anxiety, sleep disorders, ringing in the ears, heart disease and mental overload.

Physical and mental activity goes hand in hand with curiosity and the urge to move. Vata types always want to discover new things, go new ways and explore new things. They have versatile interests and talents, which they try to implement and apply with a lot of verve. This, in turn, can also turn into too much verve, which manifests itself in countless projects being tackled and then having to be abandoned again due to a lack of stamina and exhaustion. Too much Vata likes to take over.

People with a predominance of bioenergy have a high ability to communicate, they are talkative, sociable and have an open nature. They are enthusiastic and do not feel comfortable in dull routine. They definitely prevent boredom. However, if the dosha level rises too high, one quickly loses track and loses sight of the goal. Decisions are rarely made under such conditions.

Dietary tips for Vata imbalance

Tendential Vata types are more prone to high Vata levels. In this case, it is recommended to adopt different dietary patterns to counteract this. This is best achieved with rather warm, heavy, nourishing, calming, grounding, salty and sweet food.

If the organism feels too restless and agitated, you can try to counteract with enough fat and protein and juicy cooked warm meals. Hot ginger or herbal teas are recommended to drink. Digestive, warm spices also stabilize Vata. These include ginger, fennel, anise, clove, cinnamon, cumin, basil, saffron and cooked garlic.

Milk, wheat, oats, spelt, almonds, nuts, eggs and root vegetables have atissue-building and thus stabilising effect.

However, if the Vata level is too low, you can try to balance it with legumes, cabbage, mushrooms, peppers, raw onion and garlic, bitter salads and leafy vegetables, hot spices, or dry grains (millet or barley). Conversely, if you have high Vata, you will tend to avoid these foods.

Everyday tips for Vata types

If one tends strongly towards one of the three aryurvedic dosha types, it is quite easy for negative effects to set in. In the case of Vata Dosha, those affected usually complain of nervous restlessness and sleep disorders.

You don't necessarily have to be versed in this healing art, as logical as it sounds, but Ayurveda also recommends conscious relaxation, perhaps massages or baths, or simply taking time to eat in cases of nervousness and anxiety.

Wrap your daily routine in regularity and consciously pursue your desire for communication and creativity. Cultivate your spiritual inclinations and interests and practise patience, self-discipline, serenity and perseverance.

This may sound like an incredibly simple solution, but once you have recognized what makes you tick, it is actually easy to follow your own needs. One hardly dares to believe how many areas this can have a positive effect.

By the way, you can also find suitable products for your Dosha in our store .

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